Speaker Bios

Listed in alphabetical order by surname

Crystal Abidin (Curtin University)
‘Audio templates’ as Identity and Intimacy on TikTok (TikTok panel)
TikTok during COVID19: digital intimacy in times of crisis (Sex panel)
Bio: Dr Crystal Abidin is an anthropologist of vernacular internet cultures, especially influencer cultures, internet celebrity, online visibility, and social media pop cultures. Her fourth book is Mediated Interfaces: The Body on Social Media, co-edited with Katie Warfield and Carolina Cambre for Bloomsbury (2020). Crystal is Senior Research Fellow and ARC DECRA Fellow in Internet Studies at Curtin University.


Kyla Allison (University of New South Wales)
Not so wholesome anymore: exploring the downfall of the Bon Appétit brand and a fandom in crisis (Witnessing and Calling Out panel)
Bio: Briony E Anderson is a graduate researcher in Criminology at the University of Melbourne, recently commencing her PhD candidature in 2020. Briony’s thesis engages with privacy and anonymity in online space by considering the harm experience of doxxing. Her research interests bridge technology facilitated harms with theories of post-humanism and the philosophy of information.


Briony Anderson (University of Melbourne)
Viral vigilantism in COVID-19: doxxing as justice potential (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Briony E Anderson is a graduate researcher in Criminology at the University of Melbourne, recently commencing her PhD candidature in 2020. Briony’s thesis engages with privacy and anonymity in online space by considering the harm experience of doxxing. Her research interests bridge technology facilitated harms with theories of post-humanism and the philosophy of information.@BreeAnderson199


Emma Baulch (Monash University)
‘Connecting the World Privately’: Do WhatsApp privacy affordances increase safety for intimate publics? (WhatsApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Emma Baulch is Associate Professor of Media and Communications at Monash University Malaysia. Her research is located in the fields of Asian cultural studies and media and communications studies. She is interested in how new media technologies alter and are altered by existing Southeast Asian social formations revolving around race, class and ethnicity.


Paul Byron (University of Technology Sydney)
TikTok for Mental Health: Findings from a study of LGBTQ+ young people’s digital peer support (TikTok panel)
Bio: Paul Byron is a postdoctoral researcher at UTS, currently researching digital peer support among LGBTQ+ young people. Paul’s interest in digital cultures of care is explored in his forthcoming book – Digital Media, Friendship, and Cultures of Care.


Earvin Cabalquinto (Deakin University)
When the tides turn: Examining “imaginaries of care” for international students in Australia during COVID-19 (Community, Crisis, Connection panel)
Bio: Dr. Earvin Charles Cabalquinto is a Lecturer in Communication in the School of Communication and Creative Arts (SCCA) at Deakin University. He is also a member of the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalization. His research expertise lies at the intersection of digital media, mobilities and migration.


Bronwyn Carlson (Macquarie University)
Indigenous Digital Lifeworlds (Indigenous Digital Lifeworlds panel); and
Evaluating Safe Sistas: Educating young Indigenous women on privacy, risk and consent online (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Professor Bronwyn Carlson is an Aboriginal scholar who was born on and lives on Dharawal Country in Wollongong. She is the Head of the Department of Indigenous Studies at Macquarie University. Bronwyn is the recipient of three consecutive Australian Research Council grants that focus on Indigenous people’s cultural, social, intimate and political engagements on social media. She is widely published on the topic including her article, ‘Love and hate at the Cultural Interface: Indigenous Australians and dating apps’ (2019) and co-editing and contributing to two special issues; the Australasian Journal of Information Systems (2017) on “Indigenous Activism on Social Media’ and Media International Australia (2018) on “Indigenous Innovation on Social Media.”


Marcus Carter (University of Sydney)
Virtual Reality as Social Media: The Facebook / Oculus Imaginary (WhatsApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Marcus Carter is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney, where he researches games, play and mixed reality.


Marianne Clark (University of New South Wales)
Crisis and the body: the digital health entanglements of COVID-19 (Health panel)
Bio: Marianne Clark is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Vitalities Lab, Centre for Social Research in Health and Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW, Sydney. Her research examines physical cultures and the sensory and embodied dimensions of human engagements with digital technologies. She is the co-author of the forthcoming book, Sport, Fitness and Feminist New Materialisms: A Lively Introduction (Palgrave MacMillan).


Chris Comerford (University of Woolongong)
Coconuts, Custom-Play and COVID-19: An Island Walking Tour through Social Isolation and Personas in Animal Crossing: New Horizons (Games panel)
Bio: Chris Comerford is Lecturer of Communication and Media at the University of Wollongong. His current research maps the impact of cinematic television on production and reception aspects of screen studies, and the inclusion of emergent media – including social media and streaming television – in tertiary pedagogical practice.


Rob Cover (RMIT University)
Digital Hostility, Connectivity, Wellbeing: New Directions in a Time of Communication Crisis (Community, Crisis, Connection panel)
Bio: Rob Cover is Professor of Digital Communication at RMIT University, Australia. He has published widely on topics related to young people, sexual and gender diversity, social identities and mental health. Recent books include: Emergent Identities: New Sexualities, Gender and Relationships in a Digital Era, Flirting in the Era of #MeToo: Negotiating Intimacy and Population, Mobility and Belonging.


Madi Day (Macquarie University)
Evaluating Safe Sistas: Educating young Indigenous women on privacy, risk and consent online (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Madi Day specialises in research and education centring Indigenous queer mob, and addressing the relationship between heterosexualism, racial and gendered violence and settler colonialism. They are an administrator and research associate in the Department of Indigenous Studies at Macquarie University. They were born and raised on Dharug country, and have settler, Wandandian and Gugu Yalanji ancestry. Madi is currently the CI on a Facebook funded project entitled ‘The impact of racist and violent content and threats towards Indigenous women and LBGTQI+ people on social media: a comparative analysis of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA’.


Tisha Dejmanee (University of Technology Sydney)
Intimacy as Activism: #BlackOutTuesday on Instagram in the Food Blogging Community (Witnessing & Calling Out panel)
Bio: Tisha Dejmanee is a Lecturer in Digital and Social Media at the University of Technology Sydney. Her research is in the field of feminist media studies, with a focus on contemporary feminist theory, food studies and digital platforms. Her work has been published in Television and New Media, Feminist Media Studies and International Journal of Communication.


Leanne Downing (University of New South Wales)
The moments you missed: Exploring the digital intimacies of telehealth psychology consults during the COVID-19 crisis (Health panel)
Bio: Dr Leanne Downing is a Visiting Fellow at the Vitalities Lab in the Centre for Social Research in Health at UNSW Sydney. She has a PhD in Media Studies from La Trobe University and writes regularly on the topics of digital health and the emotions.


Sab D’Souza (UNSW, USYD, UTS)
It felt safe enough to post: Facebook groups, affective posting and feeling(s) online (Community Support panel)
Bio: Sab D’Souza is an artist, researcher and avid subtweeter living on unceded Gadigal land. Their research considers the emergent social media practices of marginalised users and the affective conditions of (web)site-specific intimacies. They are particularly interested the construction of safety, care and community by young queer people of colour online.


Asher Flynn (Monash University)
Digital Intimacy, Image-Based Abuse and COVID-19 (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Dr Asher Flynn is an Associate Professor of Criminology at Monash University. She is a leading international researcher in policy and prevention concerning gendered and sexual violence, as well as digital and AI-facilitated abuse.


Ben Egliston (Queensland University of Technology)
Virtual Reality as Social Media: The Facebook / Oculus Imaginary (WhatsApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Ben Egliston is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Digital Media Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology. He researches the politics and practices of digital technology. He is currently working on projects about the ethics of emerging mixed reality technologies and data analytics and creative labour in the videogame industry.


Andrew Farrell (Macquarie University)
Indigenous Digital Lifeworlds (Indigenous Digital Lifeworlds panel)
Bio: Andrew Farrell is a Wodi Wodi descendant from Jerrinja Aboriginal community on the South Coast of NSW. They are an Indigenous Early Career Academic Fellow in the Department of Indigenous Studies at Macquarie University. Their research is multidisciplinary with a focus on Aboriginal LGBTIQ+ genders and sexualities, social media, drag performance, and is currently undertaking a PhD project titled, ‘Aboriginal LGBTIQ+ peoples online’.



Heather Ford (University of Technology Sydney)
Before Intimacies: An Intimate Encyclopedia
Bio Heather Ford is an Associate Professor and Head of Discipline for Digital and Social Media at UTS’s School of Communication. She studies the politics of knowledge in the context of automated, online systems.


Ryan Frazer (Macquarie University)
Campus Gossip as Molecular Assemblages of Drama (Indigenous Digital Lifeworlds panel)
Bio: Dr Ryan Frazer is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Macquarie University, working on a project that explores Indigenous people’s experiences of online violence. In 2019, he completed his PhD at the University of Wollongong, which drew on the work of Deleuze and Guattari to understand the role of volunteer refugee resettlement organisations in producing territories of care, home and belonging.


Sophie Freeman (University of Melbourne)
“Everything is cancelled. Now what?”. Live-streaming and virtual concerts as opportunities for digital engagement and connection in music industry (Cultural Industries panel)
Bio: Sophie is a PhD candidate in the School of Computing & Information systems at the University of Melbourne, researching music recommender systems, automated music discovery and algorithmic curation. Her research is interdisciplinary across media studies and human-computer interaction (HCI). She is a graduate editor of Platform Journal of Media & Communication at UoM.


Darren Graf (Monash University)
“How a Facebook update can cost you your job”: News coverage of employment terminations following social media disclosures, from racist cops to queer teachers (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Darren Graf is a Research Assistant in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University. Darren received his Masters in media studies from Monash in 2019, on the topic of digital privacy in social media. Darren is currently working on the Social Media & Employment project: https://www.monash.edu/arts/social-sciences/social-media-and-employment-project


Benjamin Hanckel (Western Sydney University)
When the tides turn: Examining “imaginaries of care” for international students in Australia during COVID-19 (Community, Crisis, Connection panel)
Bio: Dr Benjamin Hanckel is a sociologist at Western Sydney University. Benjamin’s research examines youth wellbeing, social inequalities in health, and social change. His work has examined the design and use of digital technologies for health, and health intervention implementation, particularly in relation to the lived experiences of young people.


Taylor Hardwick (Swinburne University of Technology)
“ZONE is love, ZONE is life”: Community and Connection in the Freeplay ZONE (Cultural Industries panel)
Bio: Taylor Hardwick is a PhD candidate at Swinburne University of Technology. Her doctoral research is concerned with experiences of safety and inclusion at Melbourne games events, both in-person and digital.


Natalie A. Hendry (RMIT University)
When the tides turn: Examining “imaginaries of care” for international students in Australia during COVID-19 (Community, Crisis, Connection panel)
Bio: Natalie Ann Hendry is a Vice Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Media and Communication. Her research explores everyday social media and digital technology practices in the context of critical approaches to education, mental health, media, wellbeing, youth studies and policy. This draws on her experience prior to academia, working in community education, secondary schools and hospital settings, and consulting for health organisations and industry.


Madison Hichens (University of New South Wales)
Not so wholesome anymore: exploring the downfall of the Bon Appétit brand and a fandom in crisis (Witnessing & Calling Out panel)
Bio: Madison Hichens is a current PhD candidate at the University of New South Wales in Communication and Media Studies. Her doctoral research is interested in unpacking what she theorises to be ‘digital anxiety’ — a governing sociocultural process that drives ubiquitous digital (and social) media use.


Indigo Holcombe-James (RMIT University)
Intimate dynamics of inclusion and exclusion: Low-income households, online schooling and COVID-19 (Domestic Life panel)
Bio: Indigo Holcombe-James is a research fellow in the Technology, Communication and Policy Lab at RMIT. She researches how individuals and collectives experience digital inclusion and participation with a specific interest in how this operates within and around cultural and creative industries and institutions.


Lachlan Howells (Curtin University)
What can we learn from livestreamers? Teaching, researching, and the dynamics of videogame livestreaming (Games panel)
Bio: Nathan J Jackson is a PhD candidate in Theatre and Performance Studies at UNSW Sydney. His thesis Performative Personas in Videogame Livestreaming: An Ethnography of Twitch focuses on the construction and performance of persona in the practice of livestreaming.


Suneel Jethani (University of Technology Sydney)
After Intimacy: A research agenda for post-pandemic digitality (Outro)
Bio: Suneel Jethani is Lecturer in Digital and Social Media at the University of Technology Sydney. His research explores the relationship between sociotechnical systems of datafication and the politics of everyday life. Suneel works between academic and governmental sectors on issues relating to capacity building in data sharing and release, data governance, and data ethics. He has published in Communication, Politics & Culture, International Communication Gazette, M/C Journal, and has forthcoming books on the design politics of self-tracking technology with Emerald (2021) and on open data with Palgrave (2021).


Amelia Johns (University of Technology Sydney)
‘Connecting the World Privately’: Do WhatsApp privacy affordances increase safety for intimate publics? (WhatsApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Dr Amelia Johns is a senior lecturer in Digital and Social Media in the School of Communication at UTS. Her work is focused on youth digital media participation and citizenship. She has been published in Social Media + Society, First Monday, and Media International Australia. She is co-editor of Negotiating Digital Citizenship: Control, Contest Culture (with A McCosker and S Vivienne, 2016).


Mark Johnson (The University of Sydney)
What can we learn from livestreamers? Teaching, researching, and the dynamics of videogame livestreaming (Games panel)
Bio: Dr Mark R Johnson is a Lecturer in Digital Cultures at the University of Sydney. His research focuses on live streaming and Twitch.tv, esports, and game consumption and production. Outside academia he is also an independent game designer, a regular games blogger and podcaster, and a former professional poker player.


D. Bondy Valdovinos Kaye (Queensland University of Technology)
Leave a like if I’m on your #FYP: TikTok’s (shared) algorithmically curated content (TikTok panel)
‘Audio templates’ as Identity and Intimacy on TikTok (Sex panel)
Bio: D. Bondy Valdovinos Kaye is the Editorial Assistant for Media Industries Journal, a PhD candidate in the Digital Media Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology, and an avid musician. His research interests include digital music, cultural policy, and platform studies.


Jenny Kennedy (RMIT University)
Intimate dynamics of inclusion and exclusion: Low-income households, online schooling and COVID-19 (Domestic Life panel)
Bio: Jenny Kennedy is an ARC DECRA fellow in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT. She is an associate investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Automated Decision-Making & Society (ADM+S) and a core member of the Digital Ethnography Research Centre (DERC). Her research interests include the digital inclusion of low-income households, and the gendering of AI and automation technologies in home environments.


Jinn Lee (Curtin University)
YouTubing homo with COVID-19: South Korean LGBTQ+ YouTubers’ reaction to homophobia around the Itaewon COVID-19 outbreak (Community Support panel)
Bio: Dr Jin Lee studies media intimacies in social media cultures, particularly media practices and visibility of non-white women and LGBTQ+ people across the “old” and “new” media. Her work appears in peer-reviewed journals including Media International Australia, Social Media + Society, Critical Studies in Media Communication. She is a Research Fellow in Internet Studies at Curtin University, Australia.


Deborah Lupton (University of New South Wales)
Trust, risk and digital media: Australians’ experiences of the COVID-19 crisis (Health panel)
Bio: Deborah Lupton is SHARP Professor in the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW Sydney, working in the Centre for Social Research in Health and the Social Policy Research Centre and leading the Vitalities Lab. She is Leader of the UNSW Node of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Automated Decision-Making + Society.


Jodi McAlister (Deakin University)
Jagged Love: Narratives of Romance on Dating Apps during COVID-19 (Sex panel)
Bio: Dr Jodi McAlister is a Lecturer in Writing, Literature and Culture at Deakin University. Her research interests include romance and pop culture. Her first monograph, The Consummate Virgin, was published by Palgrave in 2020. She is also the author of the young adult paranormal romance Valentine series (Penguin Teen Australia).


Caitlin McGrane (RMIT University)
Intra-active gendered smartphone practices before, during and after crisis (Community, Crisis, Connection panel)
Bio: Caitlin McGrane is a researcher and feminist activist. Her doctoral research investigates the gendered uses, practices and impacts of smartphones. As an activist, she has worked on projects challenging gender-based harassment and abuse online and in workplaces.


Alan McKee (University of Technology Sydney)
The Netflix of Porn: Pink TV and ethical business models for digital pornography (Cultural Industries panel)
Bio: Alan McKee is a Professor in Digital and Social Media at UTS and an expert on entertainment and healthy sexual development. He recently completed an ARC grant entitled ‘Pornography’s effects on audiences: explaining contradictory research data’. His most recent co-authored book is Objectification: on the difference between sex and sexism.


Indra Mckie (University of Technology Sydney)
Beyond assistants: New ontologies for human and conversational AI interaction during lockdown (Domestic Life panel)
Bio: Indra is a 2nd year PhD student/casual academic/research assistant/ex-librarian/AI designer from the School of Communication, UTS. Her interdisciplinary PhD study uses situ naturalistic observations of human-device interactions to investigate the relationship between conversational AI across four diverse case studies: an autoethnography, children, long-term users and seniors.


Kate Mannell (University of Melbourne/RMIT)
The paradoxes of platform ambivalence: A case study of hobby sewists on Instagram (Domestic Life panel)
Bio: Kate Mannell is a sessional academic at RMIT and the University of Melbourne. Her research interests include disconnection, mobile media, young people, and alternative social media platforms. She has recently published work in Mobile Media and Communication and the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication.



Ariadna Matamoros-Fernandez (Queensland University of Technology)
‘Connecting the World Privately’: Do WhatsApp privacy affordances increase safety for intimate publics? (WhatsApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Dr. Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández is a Lecturer in Digital Media in the School of Communication at QUT, and chief investigator of the Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC). She is setting up a research agenda around platform governance in relation to humorous memes and other controversial content, and is working on research projects examining end-to-end encrypted and ephemeral communication in Latin America and Southeast Asia. end-to-end encrypted and ephemeral communication in Latin America and Southeast Asia.


Ziying Meng (University of Melbourne)
Chinese transnational video creators’ use of social media during COVID-19 lockdown (Platforms and Transnationalism panel)
Bio: Ziying Meng is a graduate student at the University of Melbourne. Her research interests include platforms, online video influencer cultures, Chinese social media and smart technologies.


Belinda Middleweek (University of Technology Sydney)
Just an orgasm gizmo? Sexual self-conception and optimization in times of crisis (Sex panel)
Bio: Belinda Middleweek is a Senior Lecturer in Communication at the University of Technology Sydney. Her research focuses on the social implications of media technologies and transdisciplinary approaches to human-tech interactions. She is the author of Feral Media? (2020) and the co-author of Real Sex Films: The New Intimacy and Risk in Cinema (2017).


Tathagata Mukherjee (Monash University)
Early investigations into the Steam platform and its construction of the ‘player’ (Games panel)
Bio: Tathagata (Tats) Mukherjee is a Master of Communications and Media Studies scholar at Monash University. He is currently working on a thesis about videogame distribution platforms and investigating the political and economic consequences of such structures from a postcolonial viewpoint.


Jasbeer Musthafa Mamalipurath (Western Sydney University)
When the tides turn: Examining “imaginaries of care” for international students in Australia during COVID-19 (Community, Crisis, Connection panel)
Bio: Jasbeer Musthafa Mamalipurath recently completed his PhD in Cultural Studies from the Institute for Culture and Society (ICS), Western Sydney University, Australia. Jasbeer’s current research project is on ‘Postsecular Storytelling on New Media’ – yielding insight into the emerging discourses about Islam. Jasbeer’s research interests are in cultural studies, media and communication studies, discourse analysis, and sociology of religion.


Emily van der Nagel (Monash University)
Lockdown horniness, intimate partners, and nudes: Social media sex in a global pandemic (Sex panel)
Bio: Dr Emily van der Nagel is a Lecturer in Social Media at Monash University. She researches social media identities, cultures, platforms, and intimacies. Her first book, Sex and Social Media, co-authored with Associate Professor Katrin Tiidenberg, was published by Emerald in 2020.


Bhuva Narayan (University of Technology Sydney)
Beyond assistants: New ontologies for human and conversational AI interaction during lockdown (Domestic Life panel)
Bio: Dr. Bhuva Narayan is the Graduate Research Coordinator for the School of Communication at UTS. Dr. Narayan teaches Design Thinking and also Qualitative Research Methods. Her research encompasses Information Science, HCI, Digital Social Media, Social Informatics, Social Justice, and Human Learning.


Giselle Newton (University of New South Wales)
“It’s Terrible That Some People Have 300 Siblings But You Can Make A Really Funny Meme About National Sibling Day”: Bonding Around Donor Conception Memes (Community support panel)
Bio: Giselle Newton is a doctoral candidate at the Centre for Social Research in Health at UNSW, Sydney. Her research explores the experiences, views and support needs of donor-conceived people.


Thao Phan (Deakin University)
What personalisation can do for you!; Or, how to do racial discrimination without “race” (WhatssApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Thao Phan is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation and the Program Coordinator for the Science and Society Network at Deakin University. She is a feminist STS researcher who analyses the technologization of gender and race in algorithmic culture.


Emma Phillips (University of Technology Sydney)
Instagram as site of sexy solidarities: a classed analysis of beauty as social utility (Sex panel)
Bio: Emma Phillips is a PhD candidate with UTS. Her research is focussed on the aesthetic components of the sexualisation debates and explores how they might be informed by classist, sexist and gendered assumptions about sexuality. She is also a professional photographer and teacher in photography, digital media and communication.


Lisa Portolan (Western Sydney University)
Jagged Love: Narratives of Romance on Dating Apps during COVID-19 (Sex panel)
Bio: Lisa Portolan is completing her PhD at Western Sydney University on dating apps, intimacy and heteronormativity. She is an author and journalist with two books published: Happy As (2018) and Pretty Girls (2020). She is the host of the podcast series, Slow Love, which examines intimacy, dating and Covid-19 – www.slowlove.net


Anastasia Powell (RMITUniversity)
Digital Intimacy, Image-Based Abuse and COVID-19 (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Dr Anastasia Powell is Associate Professor in Criminology & Justice Studies at RMIT University. Her research has specialised in sexual and intimate partner violence, as well as emerging forms of technology-facilitated violence and cyber abuse.


Michael Richardson (University of New South Wales)
Covid Contacts and the Remote Intimacies of Drone Witnessing (Witnessing & Calling Out panel)
Bio: Dr Michael Richardson is a Senior Research Fellow at UNSW. Michael’s transdisciplinary research investigates the intersection of affect, power and violence in culture, technology and politics. He is currently working on an ARC DECRA (2019-2021) on drones and witnessing in war and culture and is co-director of the UNSW Media Futures Hub.


Brady Robards (Monash University)
“How a Facebook update can cost you your job”: News coverage of employment terminations following social media disclosures, from racist cops to queer teachers (Safety, Risk & Justice panel)
Bio: Brady Robards is a Senior Research Fellow in Sociology at Monash University. He studies digital cultures, with a focus on how people use and produce social media. Brady’s latest book is Growing up on Facebook (with Sian Lincoln, 2020). You can visit Brady’s website at bradyrobards.com.


Aleesha Rodriguez (Queensland University of Technology)
Leave a like if I’m on your #FYP: TikTok’s (shared) algorithmically curated content (TikTok panel)
Bio: Aleesha Rodriguez is a PhD candidate in the Digital Media Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology. Her research examines public communication on digital platforms, with a particular interest in applying Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches to explore the dynamic and mutually shaping relationship between people and technology.


Milovan Savic (Swinburne University)
TikTok during COVID19: digital intimacy in times of crisis (TikTok panel)
Bio: Dr Milovan Savic is an author, speaker, and researcher. His research interests include youth, social media, family dynamics around digital devices, digital cultures, and digital citizenship. Milovan is passionate about making research easily accessible to non-academic audiences, policymakers and lay society alike.


Clare Southerton (University of New South Wales)
The affective atmospheres of lockdown TikTok (TikTok panel)
Bio: Clare Southerton is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Vitalities Lab, Social Policy Research Centre and Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW Sydney. Her research explores the intersections of social media, privacy, surveillance and health. Her work has been published in New Media & Society, Social Media + Society and Girlhood Studies.


Scott Wark (Warwick University)
What personalisation can do for you!; Or, how to do racial discrimination without “race” (WhatsApp with Facebook panel)
Bio: Scott Wark is a Research Fellow for the ‘People Like You: Contemporary Figures of Personalisation’ project, which is funded by a Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award. He is based at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies at the University of Warwick. He researches online culture, amongst other things.


Ash Watson (University of New South Wales)
Being together in crisis: digital co-presence and intimacy during COVID-19 (Domestic Life panel)
Bio: Ash Watson is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Vitalities Lab, UNSW Sydney. She is the creator and editor of So Fi Zine and Fiction Editor of The Sociological Review. Her research explores digital technologies, fiction and zines.


Fan Yang (Deakin University)
Research platforms but not on platforms (Platforms and Transnationalism panel)
Bio: Fan Yang is a PhD candidate at School of Communication and Creative Arts, Deakin University. Her doctoral thesis focuses on the content production practice of Australia-based Chinese ethnic media on WeChat.


Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: